A pass, is a pass, is a pass?

A pass is just a pass.

It maybe played to space.

It maybe played from or to hands.

It maybe played from or to feet.

It maybe played from or to the chest.

It may have to be strong.

It may have to be floated.

It may have to curled.

It may have to be looped.

It may have to be weighted.

It may have to be made under pressure.

It may have to be made unopposed.

It may have to be made to a moving target.

It may have to be made whilst moving.

It may have to be inch perfect.

It may have to be through a gap.

It may have to be forward.

It may have to be backwards.

It may have to be disguised.

It may have to be behind the defence.

It may have to be with the weaker foot.

It may have to be a flick.

It may have to be whilst being tackled.

It may have to be to driven low.

It may have to be made high.

It may have to be dummied.

It may be the only option.

It may have multiple options.

It may be the wrong option.

It may require finesse.

It may require a delay.

It may have to be played with time.

It may have to be played with no time.

It may have to be played first time.

It may require a first touch.

It may have to be played off balance.

No two passes are ever the same. But a pass is just a pass, right?

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13 thoughts on “A pass, is a pass, is a pass?

  1. I love this. I’m going to refer to it frequently when teaching. Sometimes students only think about scoring and individual merit. But a good pass can be a difference maker in a game setting. Thanks Sporticus! Well said.

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    1. Thanks JC. I think Dr Ash Casey summed it up much better than me yesterday in a tweet. He said:

      ‘A pass is a social process, it is a relationship between the passer, receiver, defender and state of the game etc’

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  2. Like it!!! I always focus on passing first and on the outcome of the pass – thinking, reflecting, celebrating team success through good tactical passing…! Fab.

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  3. […] In the context of a dynamic sporting environment, you want children to be able to learn to perceive …. If we as PE Teachers don’t expose them to an environment or a situation that that creates information, then its not there to be learnt. We want to try to develop dynamic responsive behaviours. I think we instinctively know that many of the skills for sports can be taught through a games approach, that there needs to be variability in practice and by playing ensures that motivation and engagement in children can be kept high. What we don’t always know is the rationale why this might be the case. […]

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  4. Thank you so much for this insight!!! This is a great way for teachers and students to see the bigger picture and move their thinking forward. We can get so stuck in the fundamental movement patterns. It is vital to put the pass (and other foundational motor skills) into application through a variety of environments. This may just help to “unstick” our thinking!

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    1. Hi Wendy. Thanks for your comment. I do think some movement patterns need to be practiced in isolation, but more and more convinced that those that require decision making need to be learnt within an environment that replicates and modifies those decisions. With regards to isolated practice we need to ask ourselves why we ask students to do this. I came across something on twitter recently that i thought I would share with you – isolated practice is good for developing the tactile senses for a mechanical advantage and proprioception. These are useful for developing basic movement competency but not skills where decisions need to be made.

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